Wound healing: Infection-free

An example of how effectively wheatgrass can heal wounds is shown in the pictures below. A skin graft has been treated by orthodox medical means for six weeks. The wound is healing very slowly and looks unhealthy because of poor blood supply. (Fig. 1) Fig. 1. Skin graft before wheatgrass…

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Wound healing effects by wheatgrass juice

Effect of Triticum aestivum juice on wound healing in rats. Singh, J., Sethi, J. Yadav, M., Sood, S., Gupta, V. Intl. J. Nat. Prod. Sci. 2011; 1: 15-20. Background: We might not think much about the process that takes place when we have a small cut or burn. A healthy…

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Wound healing wrongly attributed to chlorophyll

Brett, DW. Wounds, 17(7):190-195. 2005. Background: Chlorophyllin, derived from the plant pigment, chlorophyll, has been used for many years to accelerate wound healing and to provide odour control.  Chlorophyllin also shows activity as an anti-coagulation and an anti-inflammatory agent. These actions of chlorophyllin explain, at least to some extent, its…

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Wound healing and chlorophyll

The effect of the topical application of several substances on the healing of experimental cutaneous wounds. Brush, B., Lamb, C. 1942. Surgery. 12:355-363 Wounds made on the abdominal wall of guinea pigs were treated with various substances, including chloramines, urea crystals and chlorophyll ointment. None were found to consistently exert an accelerating effect on…

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Chlorophyll attributed with wound healing ability

Chlorophyll in wound healing and suppurative disease. Bowers, W. 1947. Am. J. Surg. 1947;73:37-50. Lieutenant Colonel Bowers of the US Army reports on the use of water-soluble derivatives of chlorophyll in over 400 cases over a period of nine months. He (and colleagues) noted several major effects, notably: loss of odour associated with…

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Wound healing, growth factors & chlorophyll

Chlorophyll. An experimental study of its water soluble derivatives in wound healing. Smith L, Livingston A. Chlorophyll.  Am. J. Surg. 1943. 62:358-369 Wound healing involves an inflammatory (exudative) phase and a proliferative tissue growth and repair phase that presumably involves growth stimulating factors. This study tested various water soluble chlorophyll preparations…

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Wounds: Diabetic – healing of infected wound

A challenging healing task This 55 y.o. non-insulin dependent diabetic female suffered a severe injury to her knee. After closure with 26 sutures (stitches), it soon became infected and re-opened. Two weeks later, most of the sutures had ruptured and the patient suffered severe pain. (Fig. 1.). After cleansing, the wound…

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Animals: Wounds & other healing

by Robert McDowell. Veterinary Herbalist (2003) A horse in a paddock will go to enormous lengths to puncture, rip, graze or tear itself open on anything it can find. It will also strike and bite at its neighbors and try to hang itself up the fences whenever it can. Horse owners…

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Wounds: How wheatgrass (probably) accelerates healing

Orthodox method of wound management Exudate is the clear liquid that “leaks” from a wound surface. It supplies essential nutrients to cells involved in the wound-healing process. (1) if allowed to dry, it can adhere to the overlying wound dressing making it difficult to remove. However, if wheatgrass extract is…

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Wounds: Healing & many other uses

When I look back, I wonder how I ever managed to practice medicine without wheatgrass extract. As a general practitioner, there are so many ways it can be put to use. For instance, wound healing, burns and soft tissue injuries, earache and high fever in children. Side effects are rare….

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